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If this will be your first time ordering from Banggood, you should know a few things.

Here’s why this page is a little bit different from the other ones in the Shopping List. Normally, the pages are divided up into categories like motors, frame, flight controller, and then you get to pick from several choices in each category. But Tiny Whoops aren’t usually built like that. The selection of parts is pretty limited, and the selection of great parts that we want to recommend is even smaller. The other complication is that bind-n-fly Whoops are very good, and fewer people build from scratch. In some cases, if you DO want to build from scratch, the best way to go about it is to buy a bind-n-fly Whoop and upgrade it.

What about the phrase “Tiny Whoop”. Tiny Whoop is a registered trademark of Jesse Perkins, also known as Mr. Tiny Whoop. Jesse was instrumental in forming and popularizing this category of drone. So much so that people generically call every drone in this category a “Tiny Whoop,” even though technically only Jesse’s products are official Tiny Whoops. We’re also going to do that on this page.

So what defines this category then? A Tiny Whoop is a quadcopter with wheelbase of 65mm to 85mm, using a frame with prop guards, and props of about 31mm to 40mm. Some people are probably going to disagree with that, but that’s what we’re using for this page.

Thanks to Ahren Ciotti for his help picking parts for this list. Ciotti is incredibly experienced and knowledgeable with this class of quadcopter, and I couldn’t have made this page without him. Please visit his YouTube channel and website – CiottiFPV.com.

BIND N FLY / RTF

Sometimes, there are so many great examples in a category that it’s difficult to decide which ones to include on this site. When it comes to bind-n-fly Whoops, we don’t have that problem. There are just a few that are consistently better than most of the others in terms of performance and durability.

HAPPYMODEL MOBULA6
65MM ELRS

Purchase at RaceDayQuads – ELRS / FrSky
Purchase at GetFPV – ELRS / FrSky
Purchase at NewBeeDrone – ELRS / FrSky
Purchase at Pyrodrone – ELRS / FrSky
Purchase at Banggood – ELRS / FrSky
Purchase at Amazon – ELRS / FrSky

 

In our (informal) opinion, the Mobula6 has been the most popular bind-n-fly Whoop since it came out. In a world where new stuff takes over every six months, that’s saying a lot. Whenever you build a quad this small, you make some compromises in terms of range and camera image quality, but the Mobula6 is as good or better than its competition, and its flight performance is spectacular. Notably, its video transmitter is rated up to 200 mW, instead of the 25 mW that most other Whoops have, which gives more than 2x the range.

We recommend the highest-kv motors (25,000 kv 0802 or 26,000 kv 0702 depending which receiver type you buy), even though they might be too powerful for some pilots. If that’s the case, use the Betaflight “motor output scale” function to reduce the output to a value you’re comfortable with. The higher kv will always be waiting for you when you’re ready.

The Mobula6 has traditionally come with a built-in FrSky compatible receiver. There are two problems with this. First, it has poor range. Second, newer FrSky radios with ACCESS protocol won’t bind to it without buying an external transmitter module. Happymodel now sells the Mob6 with a built in ExpressLRS receiver, which has significantly better range. This is the one we recommend, if you’re willing to tackle the learning curve of getting started with ELRS.

On paper, it’s a little hard to justify choosing the Acrobee over the Mobula6. The Mob6 is significantly less expensive and has a more powerful video transmitter. The reason the Acrobee is here is its quality. Happymodel quality is … acceptable. Newbeedrone’s quality is higher, although nobody’s perfect. In addition, Newbeedrone ships from the USA. Which, if you’re in the USA is great. But if you’re anywhere else, you’ll probably prefer the Happymodel.

The BLV3 video transmitter operates at 120 mW. The increased output power gives better range and signal penetration through obstacles. But some Whoop races may require vTX to turn down to 25 mW in order to reduce interference between pilots. In that case, this vTX wouldn’t be ideal, since it doesn’t have a 25 mW mode.

The Mobula7 takes what’s good about the Mobula6 and scales it up from 65mm to 75mm. Instead of a 1S battery, the Mobula7 uses 2S. This, combined with larger motors and props, gives it more power and speed than the Mob6, as well as a little longer flight times. The tradeoff is that there’s less of that “turn on a dime” agility that Whoops are known for.

The 75mm is still too small to be fully comfortable outdoors in even a little bit of wind, and its size makes it a bit harder to squeeze into tiny gaps and through gates when indoors. So don’t assume that bigger equals better. Some pilots feel that the 75mm fixes everything “wrong” with the “tiny, under-powered” 65mm class. Others feel that 65mm is perfect just as it is, and anything else ruins the delicate balance that makes the formula so fun. You just have to decide which one you are.

Here’s what makes this quad stand out: it’s got HDZero digital high-definition video instead of standard-definition analog. HDZero is a generational leap forward in image quality and range compared to the analog video transmitters typically used on Whoops. HDZero is particularly appropriate for small quads because its video transmitters are light–not as light as analog vTX, but much lighter than DJI. In short, HDZero is the best video system for ultra-small quads today.

Bear in mind, you won’t be able to use this with your standard analog FPV goggles. You need an HDZero video receiver or goggles with HDZero receiver built in.
The HDZero version of the Mobula7 is a bit heavier than the analog version, so it doesn’t fly quite as well, but it’s still usable indoors, and the improvement in video quality and range will be more than worth it to most people.

HDZero isn’t the only thing that makes this quad stand out. It’s also got a built-in ExpressLRS receiver. For more on ExpressLRS, visit the Controller/Receiver page of this site.

IFLIGHT ALPHA A85
85MM

Purchase at GetFPV

We almost didn’t include 85mm quads on this page. They’re in an awkward middle ground where you might as well go up to a 95mm, which will fly better and longer, without being too much bigger or heavier. But there’s one specific reason to choose an 85mm Whoop, and that’s if you want the smallest possible quad that carries a DJI FPV video transmitter.

Once people start flying the DJI FPV system, they often don’t want to fly anything else, and they’re willing to make compromises to make it happen. This quad is the perfect example of that. It’s heavy and not that agile. But it’s small, and it does fly, and it works with your DJI FPV goggles. It’s got prop guards so you can fly it indoors, although the weight and power makes it more challenging than a proper 65mm Whoop.

65 MM CHEAP / EASY BUILD

This cheap/easy build starts with the Mobula6 bind-n-fly. The weakest part of this quad is the HappyModel frame, so we upgrade it to the BetaFPV Meteor65 frame.

Gemfan 1219-3 31mm props are significantly more thrusty than the stock HQ bi-blade props that ship with the Mobula6 with only a slight sacrifice in efficiency/run time.

Next, we swap the factory PH2.0 connector out for a BT2.0 pigtail, which gives lower resistance and less voltage drop, making the most of the tiny Tiny Whoop batteries. If you’re planning to switch to the BT2.0 connector, it’s better to make this decision early, since you’ll need to buy batteries with a matching connector. You don’t want to use an adapter cable for flying, although it’s fine to use an adapter for charging the packs. If you’re already heavily invested in PH2.0 cells, switching the quad to a BT2.0 connector might not make sense.

For batteries, we strongly recommend the “square cell” style of pack, which is used in the linked Tattu batteries, as well as the NewBeeDrone Nitro Nectar Gold. We believe these are all the same cell being labeled by different brands. If you end up using PH2.0 connector, you can still get very good performance by using this style of battery.

The last upgrade we recommend is the TrueRC Singularity 5.8 GHz Short U.FL Antenna. This will make the most of the (admittedly weak) vTX on the quad. You need to buy the Short version which we link here. The Ultra-short is too short to work with the quad’s canopy. And the long version is needlessly heavy/floppy.

HAPPYMODEL MOBULA6
65MM ELRS

Purchase at RaceDayQuads – ELRS / FrSky
Purchase at GetFPV – ELRS / FrSky
Purchase at NewBeeDrone – ELRS / FrSky
Purchase at Pyrodrone – ELRS / FrSky
Purchase at Banggood – ELRS / FrSky
Purchase at Amazon – ELRS / FrSky

 

TRUERC SINGULARITY
5.8GHZ SHORT U.FL ANTENNA

Purchase at RaceDayQuads
Purchase at Pyrodrone
Purchase at TrueRC

“SQUARE CELL” 1S 300 MAH
75C LIPO WITH BT 2.0 OR PH 2.0

Purchase at Pyrodrone  BT 2.0 / PH 2.0
Purchase at NewBeeDrone  BT 2.0 / PH 2.0
Purchase at Banggood BT 2.0 / PH 2.0
Purchase at Makerfire  BT 2.0 / PH 2.0
Purchase at Amazon  BT 2.0 / PH 2.0
Purchase at weBLEEDfpv  BT 2.0 / PH 2.0

65 MM HIGH QUALITY / EXPERT BUILD

The high-quality 65mm build starts with one of the best-built Whoop flight controllers available, the NewBeeDrone Acrobee65 BB BLV3. Bear in mind that this FC has non-standard plugs on it, which only work with NewBeeDrone’s motors, so you’ll need to solder on the JST0.8 4 pin connector to each motor. (That’s part of what makes this a HQ/Expert build).

The HGLRC Aeolus motors are the best balance of performance and durability available today. (Happymodel’s Mobula6 motors are more powerful, but Ciotti says they’re significantly less durable.) We recommend the 25000 kv version, and if that’s too much power for you to control, use a motor output limit to scale them down in Betaflight.

ExpressLRS is hands-down the best receiver option for Whoops, since they come with tiny ceramic antennas on the receiver, and don’t need any external antenna.

The BetaFPV Meteor65 is Ciotti’s choice as the most durable Whoop frame available.

Next, choose the battery connector: a BT2.0 pigtail, which gives lower resistance and less voltage drop than the usual PH2.0 connector, making the most of the tiny Tiny Whoop batteries. If you’re planning to use the BT2.0 connector, it’s better to make this decision early, since you’ll need to buy batteries with a matching connector. You don’t want to use an adapter cable for flying, although it’s fine to use an adapter for charging the packs. If you’re already heavily invested in PH2.0 cells, switching the quad to a BT2.0 connector might not make sense.

For batteries, we strongly recommend the “square cell” style of pack, which is used in the linked Tattu batteries, as well as the NewBeeDrone Nitro Nectar Gold and weBLEEDfpv batteries. We believe these are all the same cell being labeled by different brands. If you end up using PH2.0 connector, you can still get very good performance by using this style of battery.

The last upgrade we recommend is the TrueRC Singularity 5.8 GHz Short U.FL Antenna. This will make the most of the (admittedly weak) vTX on the quad. You need to buy the Short version which we link here. The Ultra-short is too short to work with the quad’s canopy. And the long version is too long to easily tuck under the canopy.

NEWBEEDRONE JST 0.8
4-PIN CONNECTOR

Purchase at NewBeeDrone

TRUERC SINGULARITY
5.8GHZ SHORT U.FL ANTENNA

Purchase at RaceDayQuads
Purchase at Pyrodrone
Purchase at TrueRC

“SQUARE CELL” 1S 300 MAH
75C LIPO WITH BT 2.0 OR PH 2.0

Purchase at Pyrodrone  BT 2.0 / PH 2.0
Purchase at NewBeeDrone  BT 2.0 / PH 2.0
Purchase at Banggood BT 2.0 / PH 2.0
Purchase at Makerfire  BT 2.0 / PH 2.0
Purchase at Amazon  BT 2.0 / PH 2.0
Purchase at weBLEEDfpv  BT 2.0 / PH 2.0

75 MM TINY WHOOP BUILD

For props, we recommend the Gemfan 1610-2 bi-blade, it’s got a more aerodynamic and aggressive blade profile than the HQ for a bit more thrust and efficiency.

Finding the best battery in this category is difficult. We normally recommend the “square-cell” style battery with BT2.0 connector. But those are only available in sizes which don’t fit the battery tray on the Mobula7 frame. In addition, they’re available in 300 mAh, and the 75mm quad is better with a battery closer to 400 mAh. So we recommend the GNB 380 mAh pack with PH2.0 connector instead. (Incidentally, the availability of good batteries is one of the reasons why many people prefer 65mm over 75mm Whoops.)

The HGLRC Aeolus motors are the best balance of performance and durability available today. (Happymodel’s motors are more powerful, but Ciotti says they’re significantly less durable.) We recommend the 25000 kv version, and if that’s too much power for you to control, or if the additional weight of the 75mm build stresses your battery too much, use a motor output limit to scale them down in Betaflight.

The last upgrade we recommend is the TrueRC Singularity 5.8 GHz Short U.FL Antenna. This will make the most of the (admittedly weak) vTX on the quad. You need to buy the Short version which we link here. The Ultra-short is too short to work with the quad’s canopy. And the long version is needlessly heavy/floppy.

TRUERC SINGULARITY
5.8GHZ SHORT U.FL ANTENNA

Purchase at RaceDayQuads
Purchase at Pyrodrone
Purchase at TrueRC

GNB 380MAH
1S 3.8V HV 90C

Purchase at Pyrodrone
Purchase at Amazon

BATTERY CHARGERS

This is a handy little charger if you’ve got batteries with BT2.0 connector. It doubles as a checker and a charger, and plugs into any USB-C cable for power. The main limitation is that it only charges up to 2 packs at a time. If you really love this charger and you’re using packs with PH2.0 connector, you could always buy some adapter cables. This charger only charges to 4.35v for HV packs. Almost all Whoop packs are HV, but if you need standard lipo (4.20v) charging, this one’s not for you.

This charger charges up to four packs at once. Each bank of two ports can be separately set to HV or normal lipo charging, so you can mix cells if you need to. The charger will trickle charge cells that have been discharged too low, to bring them back to life. It’s powered from any 5v/2A USB source, via micro-USB plug. The charger has PH2.0 connectors, but can be used with BT2.0 batteries if you buy adapter cables.

This is, hands down, my personal favorite Whoop battery charger today. It charges up to six packs at once. It can be powered off of both USB-C or XT60, so you can use your big flight packs to charge your Whoop packs if you’re away from power. (One catch: it only takes up to 5S input voltage, not 6S.) It’s got both PH2.0 and BT2.0 connectors, so no adapters are needed. It charges both standard lipo and HV lipos, but all ports must use the same type–no mixing.

But the single feature that puts this charger over the top for me is that it has storage mode! Lipos hate being left at full charge or empty for long periods of time. Most lipo chargers have a storage mode, which puts the packs at a safe 3.8v / cell so they can be stored for a long time without damage. But Whoop chargers don’t have this. So your Whoop packs get left fully charged (or empty) and before you know it, they’re worn out. With the Whoopstor, you can put your Whoop packs to storage voltage, the same as you do with your larger packs, and extend their life.

SERIES CHARGING BOARDS
FOR 1S WHOOP BATTERIES

Purchase at RaceDayQuads – Flying Sandal Board / Happymodel Board
Purchase at NewBeeDrone – Fractal Parallel Board
Purchase at weBLEEDfpv – Fractal Parallel Board
Purchase at Banggood – Happymodel Board

Let’s get one thing straight: these are NOT battery chargers. They’re series charging boards that let you easily charge your Whoop packs on your big-battery charger. Plug in your Whoop packs to the board. Plug the board into your charger as if it was a regular battery. The charger will auto-detect the number of “cells” (Whoop packs) plugged in, and then you can charge, discharge, and storage charge, just like normal. The charger will top off and balance the “cells”, and at the end of the cycle, you’ll be left with all the packs at whatever voltage you desire.

There are some quirks to this method, and many people prefer a simple set-and-forget dedicated Whoop battery charger. But these series boards offer functions like discharge and storage charge that most Whoop chargers leave out.

The Happymodel and the Flying Sandal boards support only up to four packs at a time, while the Fractal Engineering board supports up to six.

The Fractal Engineering board sold at WeBleedFPV is the only one of these that comes with the BT2.0 plugs installed. The others have empty spots where you can solder your own BT2.0 plugs, but you have to source them and solder them yourself.

TINY WHOOP
STORAGE DISCHARGER

Purchase at Tiny Whoop

Leaving packs charged for a long period of time wears them out and makes them perform worse. Plug your Whoop packs into this little gadget and it’ll take them down to a safe 3.8v over the course of a couple of hours.

The main drawback of this device is its cost. You’ll want several to bring your packs down to storage in a reasonable amount of time, and by the time you’ve bought four or five, you could pick up the ViFly WhoopStor and have a more functional solution. But the tiny keychain size of the Tiny Whoop discharger is certainly appealing.